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UPDATE! ALERT! FRAUDULENT JOB SCAM WITH A CHECK

"UMBC Student Job"- With Upfront Check?? DO NOT BE FOOLED

January 5, 2021 4:29 PM
The following email with a FAKE "UMBC CHECK" was sent to a UMBC student and IT IS A SCAM.

Hello , Follow the instruction below to deposit 
Print out and Cut it to a ( check size/shape ) At the back of your check Endorse by writing Your 
Full name
Mobile Deposit Only
Your account number
Sign.

Once you done you make a mobile deposit
Thank You,
Lisa Drouillard
Account Officer

Notes regarding this fraudulent email:
  • It did not actually come from a UMBC Account Officer. 
  • Do NOT cash checks that you did not perform work for or were sent under circumstances that are abnormal to standard hiring procedures. 
  • Notice that the email poorly written and that they ask you to cut the check out to a check size shape
  • BEWARE Once the check is deposited, the scammer is able to deplete funds from that person's account.
  • NEVER provide your credit card, bank account numbers, social security number or other financial documentation.
If you have received a scam or fraudulent email:
DoIT Security Team investigates any email scam that we send to them, however, the original email must be sent from the recipient of the email scam.  In order to assist the DoIT Security Team's investigation, recipients of the email should send security@umbc.edu a notification including the full header set of the message. These headers are not normally displayed but can be easily accessed. For more instruction on how to send the full header set of the message, please refer to: https://wiki.umbc.edu/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=1867970 
More information on scams and attacks on the website may be found here: https://itsecurity.umbc.edu

The Career Center works very hard to ensure that job postings in UMBCworks are legitimate positions, however, scammers are becoming more and more creative, especially in these difficult economic times. A recent scam that has been brought to our attention may be reviewed below. 

Email from scammer to UMBC student:

Dr Deborah <owens0101@gmail.com>
to (UMBC student)

Due to the concerns surrounding COVID-19, Also
affecting the university academic calendar ,we urgently
need the services of a competent student administrative
assistant to work Part-time and get paid $350 weekly.
Tasks will be carried out remotely. If interested, Do text
your name to {832) 97 5-0343 so as to proceed
Merry Christmas!

Best Regards,
Dr Deborah P. Webb
Assistant Director of Supplemental Instruction
Academic Success Center
Sherman Hall (Academic IV Bldg), Room 348
(832) 975-0343

Here are some things we would like to point in regards to the fraudulent job offer above:
  1. Look at the email domain of the sender: (owens0101@gmail.com). Be CAUTIOUS if the domain does not match the domain of the company. In this case, the email is supposed to come from a UMBC staff member. The domain of this sender is a Gmail account and not a UMBC account.
  2. BE CAUTIOUS of an employer whose posting includes multiple spelling and grammatical errors. While they may seem minor, this "employer" misuses capital letters, comas and spacing which is something valid employers rarely do to this extent.
  3. The scammer asks the candidate to "text their name" to a specific number to proceed. BE CAUTIOUS of an employer who asks for anything out of the ordinary or who is not operating by normal hiring procedures, such as texting personal information or hiring you without interviewing you.
Here are some other things to remember:
  1. The FROM address on an email can easily be spoofed/faked. Just because an email you receive looks like it came from an “@umbc.edu” address or someone you know, does not always mean it actually came from that person.
  2. Some people may ask, “How does a scammer get my UMBC email address in the first place?” Your email address is not private information. If someone knows your name, they can look up your UMBC email address in the campus directory, or if you have your email address attached to social media or other online accounts and those get hacked, or if someone you know has had their email hacked, etc.  
  3. Never click on the links in a phishing message.  Just by clicking on the link, you may download a malicious program onto your computer.
The Career Center is here to support you. If you encounter a position that you fear may be fraudulent, don’t hesitate to reach out to us careers@umbc.edu

Please see the attachment for more information on fraudulent jobs and phishing scams.